Haven Hill Kennel Bull Terriers and Italian Greyhounds in South Carolina

"Nothing in America is more American or more expressive of the American spirit than that of the little
American dog, the Boston terrier."

He is so gay, so bright, so stylish!  He has been in favor for more than half a century, yet the Boston terrier,
like America itself will always be as new as a fresh-minted silver dollar. And while a silver dollar  may loose
its shine - and usually does, the Boston terrier has proved again and again that he loses none of his glisten,
his start, is so full of genuine delights and surprises that the world is far, far better for many thousands
of people because of his presence in homes throughout this land and many other lands."


Vincent G. Perry
THE BOSTON TERRIER,
(First Edition published in 1928)



"The question is often asked, "How did the Boston Terrier originate?"    
                        
Briefly stated it may be said to have resulted from a cross between the English Bulldog and the white English Terrier, and then to have been considerably inbred.  Incidental peculiarities of the first dogs used as sires are partly responsible for the present type."


From a book entitled THE BOSTON TERRIER by J. Varnum Mott, MD


Breeds used in the creation of the Boston Terrier:   
                        
~English Terrier

~White English Terrier
(Extinct)
~Bull Terrier
~French Bulldog
~Bulldogs
~English Black and Tan or
"Manchester"


A Pictorial History of the Boston Terrier

All images and content  Copyright © Haven-Hill
In this picture from the 1800's we see two dogs of the type that that contributed to the development of the Boston Terrier. Although nothing is known of these particular dogs; the dog on the left resembles many of the "Bull and Terrier" type dogs  that were used in the very early stages of development. The dog on the right has more terrier-like features, similar in appearance to the extinct English Terrier which is said to have played a role in the early development of the Boston Terrier.  A delicately balanced combination of both Bull and Terrier blood was used to achieve the moderate appearance of the Boston Terrier.
ORIGIN and BEGINNINGS

"In 1865 Robert C. Hooper imported Hooper's Judge from England. Judge was a cross between an English Bulldog and a **White English Terrier. Judge was then bred to an English Bulldog bitch, Burnett's Gyp, owned by Edward Burnett of Massachusetts. Hooper's Judge was a 32 pound dog, high on leg, dark brindle, with white face markings. Burnett's gyp was a white Bulldog, short faced, stockily built, and short stationed with a three quarter tail. This breeding produced Wells' Eph, a short stationed, evenly marked, dark brindle. Wells' Eph was then bred to Tobin's Kate, a smaller, short headed, golden brindle dog, which produced Bernard's Tom, whelped in 1877.

To correct uneven type in the early breedings, a bully type bitch would be bred to a Bull Terrier and a too-terrier type bitch would be bred to a Bulldog. French Bulldogs were occasionally used to help establish type and to reduce size in these early breedings. In 1891, the breeders established a Stud Register showing about seventy-five dogs whose ancestors could be traced for three complete generations. These dogs proved to be the foundation stock of today's Boston Terriers.


Bernard's Tom was bred to Kelley's Nell, a dark brindle of even markings,
weighing approximately twenty pounds. From this breeding came Bernard's Mike, who had the large. full, round eyes that became so important to the breed.
He was a light brindle color with white markings and weighed approximately
twenty-five pounds. Mike also had another quality favored by early breeders-
a short crew tail. He sired the first Boston to be registered by the American
Kennel Club, who was named Punch.                                          
                                                                   
These dogs were first exhibited in the New  England Kennel   Club show in   Boston in April 1888, at which time they were shown in classes for  Round-Headed Bull Terriers. These dogs were originally called American Bull Terriers, but upon being admitted to the American Kennel Club In 1893  the name was changed to Boston Terrier.


In the years before 1900, only four Boston Terriers completed their championships: Topsey, Spider, Montey, and Tansey. Monte was sired by Goode's Buster, a rich mahogany brindle with even face markings..Buster and Monte sired close to 20 percent of the registered Boston Terriers prior to 1900. "

Origin and beginnings of the Boston Terrier Breed by Beverly and Michael Staley from their book The Boston Terrier. An American Original

** Accounts by some early breeders say Hooper's Judge was actually a cross between an English Bull and Bull Terrier

Early Influential
Sires and Dams

These dogs provided the early foundation for the breed. Present day type was set fairly quickly and some of the earliest Bostons from the turn of the 19th century looked like the dogs we see today.

Well's Eph
Was a low stationed, dark brindle dog with even white markings, weighing 28 lbs. Eph was a result of a mating between Hooper's Judge, a dog imported from England and a bitch named Gyp (or Kate). Gyp was owned by Edward Burnett, a prominent early breeder.
  1. Well's Eph
    Well's Eph
    A Patriarch of the breed.
  2. Bernard's Tom
    Bernard's Tom
    Son of Wells' Eph x Tobin's Kate. A brindle weighing 22 lbs, said to posses the first screw tail in the breed.
  3. Atkinson's Toby
    Atkinson's Toby
    Brother of Bernard's Tom
  4. Hook's Punch
    Hook's Punch
    Descendant of of Hooper's Judge. First AKC registered Boston Sire of first AKC Champion, CH Topsey.
  5. Hall's Max
    Hall's Max
    Descendant of Hoopers Judge. An extremely good natured dog "that could almost talk." Max was owned by Dr. Hall and was said to have been used extensively at stud.
  6. Hollander's Pete
    Hollander's Pete
    A brindle and white with a classic ear crop.
  7. O'Brian's Rossie
    O'Brian's Rossie
  8. Weiner's Bessie
    Weiner's Bessie

From Stable Dog to House Dog

"The smaller dog (Boston Terrier) graduated from stable and barber shop. He was soon replacing the Pug and precious toy spaniel in the drawing rooms of the fashionable, and while charming milady, no end, he found favor in the master's eyes because of his spirit and gameness."

Vincent G. Perry
THE BOSTON TERRIER,
(3rd Edition published in 1950)

ESTABLISHING TYPE
Some of the earliest examples of Boston Terriers ranged widely in size. Early accounts describe dogs as small as 6 lbs, or as large as 30 lbs. Over time, we have seen more consistancy in size develop.

""We consider it a real stroke of genius that the early breeders used the Bulldog as the mother of the Boston Terrier and the Bull Terrier, a cross between the English Bulldog and the White English Terrier, as the father. These two breeds contained enough of the Bulldog heredity to stabilize the resulting breed. "
"The establishment of type was the most difficult task for early breeders.It was the French Bulldog that was of great help in establishing the desired type. Since the French Bulldog was the result of inbreeding some English Bulldogs belonging to the lace makers of Nottingham, this genealogy made the French Bulldog the perfect choice to assist in the improvement of the Boston Terrier breed. Occasionally you will still see a Boston Terrier that is a throw back to the French Bulldog crosses that were done by the early breeders. It is amazing that out of all of these early breedings, varying so greatly in size and color, the forefathers of our breed were able to produce as much uniformity as they did. This is not to say that these dogs were anywhere near the quality of today's Boston Terriers. They had much improvement ahead in establishing type in body, head, color, markings, and size.


 Although the original weighed approximately 30 pounds, there was immediately a decided variation in weight, with much popularity being accorded to the smaller Boston-so muc
h popularity, in fact, that there was a toy class for Boston Terriers under 12 pounds. Eventually this class was eliminated and the divisions were changed to under 15 pounds, fifteen to twenty pounds, and twenty to twenty-five pounds."


Origin and Beginnings of the Boston Terrier Breed by Beverly and Michael Staley from their book The Boston Terrier. An American Original
From "Round Head" and "Boston Bull" to AKC Boston Terrier
Always the "American Gentleman"
By 1891, the early breeders, who had kept records of all their breedings,  had applied to the American Kennel club to register their distinct breed of dogs, known as Round Heads. On March  31, 1891.

Charles Leland held the first meeting of breeders.  The first standard for the breed was presented a week later, on April  7.

Image
"CH. Arroyo Anarchist"
"A.K.C.S.B. 198. 917.  [Stud] Fee $15.00
Owned by Mr. Freeman Ford, Arroyo Kennels, Pasadena Cal.
Chas. O. Chase, Agent, Egypt, Mass."

Round-Headed Bull and Terrier
An Early Standard
These dogs were first exhibited in the New  England Kennel   Club show in   Boston in April 1888, at which time they were shown in classes for  Round-Headed Bull Terriers. These dogs were originally called American Bull Terriers, but upon being admitted to the American Kennel Club In 1893  the name was changed to Boston Terrier.